Frontline Salute: Red Gables Hospital Part 2

Doing Our Bit

On the Terrace at Red Gables Hospital

I’m continuing my tribute to those battling COVID-19 in our hospitals, nursing homes and as first responders by digging through my archives of First World War hospital photographs.

This is the second of a two-part feature on the Red Gables Private Hospital in Bletchingley, Surrey. In addition to the photos and postcards from Private John Denholm’s scrapbook I’ve included two clippings from the Surrey Mirror. One of them provides a good overview of the facility and a photograph of Dr. Abbott, staff and patients from 1915. The scrapbook includes a real photo postcard of the same image that appeared in the newspaper and so I’ve transcribed the names included in the article to ensure they will be found by internet search engines.

Private John Denholm spent six months at Red Gables however that was only part of a long period of convalescence…

View original post 427 more words

Frontline Salute: Red Gables Hospital Part 1

Doing Our Bit

Private Denholm at Red Gables Hospital in Surrey in May 1916

I’m continuing my tribute to those battling COVID-19 in our hospitals, nursing homes and as first responders by digging through my archives of First World War hospital photographs.

This week I”m featuring a series of photos taken at the Red Gables Private Hospital in Bletchingley, Surrey. The hospital was established by Mr. F.C. Abbott in November 1914 and operated as a convalescence home until February 1919. It specialized in treating men who received fractures of major bones due to shell or gunshot fire. One such patient was Private John Denholm of the 16th Battalion (Canadian Scottish) who was admitted in April 1916 after being seriously wounded in January of that year. I’ve written a dozen articles on Private Denholm and have featured many photos from his amazing First World War scrapbook.

I have over two dozen photographs taken at…

View original post 170 more words

“…we cannot buy a candle or any thing to eat…”: Letters from Lance-Corporal Parker

On January 24, 1916 a man from Hastings, Ontario enlisted with the 93rd Battalion, so beginning his military career. We have one postcard and three letters from his overseas service, and they give us the opportunity to look a bit deeper into the war experience of Private John Edward Parker (reg. no. 195573).[i] Private Parker … Continue reading “…we cannot buy a candle or any thing to eat…”: Letters from Lance-Corporal Parker

Remembering my Great-Grandfather, and the Battle of Vimy Ridge

thehistoryhub

100 years ago today, my great-grandfather, Russell Emerson Poste, joined 100,000 other Canadians in capturing Vimy Ridge.

Early in the morning on Easter Monday, April 9, 1917, the Battle of Vimy Ridge began. For the first time in the First World War, all four Canadian divisions fought on the same battlefield. They progressed quickly, and by April 12, the entire ridge was under Allied control. With the capture of Hill 145, the highest feature on the ridge, the operation was considered a resounding success. The ridge remained in Allied hands for the duration of the war. The victory at Vimy Ridge did not come without cost: Canadian casualties reached 10,602, of which 3,598 were killed.

20170409_095119

Russell Emerson Poste had enlisted in the 18th Western Ontario Battalion when he was only 17 years old. He fought in the trenches alongside his brothers, Ernest and Arthur. Unlike so many, all three came…

View original post 147 more words

First Galt Daily Reporter Employee to Be Wounded

An article in the December 21, 1915 edition of the Galt Daily Reported relates the first casualty from former Galt Reporter employees serving in the war, Private John Hollins, had been wounded during service with the 18th Battalion. Private Hollins enlisted on November 4, 1914, at Galt with the 18th Battalion and gave his trade … Continue reading First Galt Daily Reporter Employee to Be Wounded

Eager to Get Over There: Private Drinkwater’s Desire

The seems to be no lack of enthusiasm for the Galtonians that joined the 18th Battalion to get into the fight. Even with the advent of static trench warfare due to the mechanization of combat from the use of rapid-fire weapons and massed artillery ending in casualties that had amounted to 9,182 Canadian casualties since … Continue reading Eager to Get Over There: Private Drinkwater’s Desire