Hepworth, Harry: Service no. 406736

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Digitized Service Record

Source: September 1916 K.I.A.

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Summary of Service[i] for Private Harry Hepworth, reg. no. 406736

DateEventRemarks
September 6, 1867BornBorn at West Ardsley, Yorkshire, England.
April 20, 1915EnlistsEnlists at Hamilton, Ontario with the 36th Battalion. He was 38-year-old labourer married to Louisa Francis Hepworth and she lived at 9 Ardvorlich Avenue[ii], Hamilton, Ontario. He stood 5’6” tall, was 140 pounds, and had a fresh complexion, brown eyes and dark hair. He was an adherent to the Church of England. He is assigned to “D” Company.
May 1915Separation AllowanceSeparation Allowance of $20.00 per month started for his wife.
May 1915Assigned PayAssigned Pay of $20.00 per month started for his wife.
June 19, 1915Unit SailsLeaves Canada.
June 28, 1915ArrivesArrives in England.
August 14, 1915Forfeits PayForfeits 1-day’s pay for being absent August 12 and 13, 1915.
November 1, 1915TransferredTransferred from the 36th Battalion to the 18th Battalion.
November 2, 1915ArrivedArrived at CBD.
November 6, 1915Proceeded to Join Unit 
November 11, 1915Arrived UnitArrived with the 18th Battalion in the field.
September 15/16. 1916WoundedService records do not state specifically the date of wounding for this soldier, but the Battalion was heavily engaged in combat on September 15 and part of the 16th during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. He was wounded with a GSW to left arm and thigh. He also has a wound on the anterior supine portion of his spine.
September 17, 1916AdmittedAdmitted to No. 23 General Hospital, Etaples, France.
September 20, 1916Died of WoundsDied of wounds at No. 23 General Hospital, Etaples, France.
September 1916InterredInterred at ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Grave Reference XV. D. 4A. He is buried with 17 other of his 18th Battalion comrades.
January 29, 1917Record Transferred to FileStamp dated this date of this soldier’s Conduct Card. It indicates he was transferred to the 18th Battalion on November 1, 1915. His company commander was a S.G. Evel and his character was assessed as “fair”.
June 15, 1920War Service GratuityWar Service Gratuity issued at the value of $180.00 to Mrs. Luisa Francis Hepworth resident at 365 Charlton Avenue, West, Hamilton, Ontario.
September 29, 1920Plaque DespatchedPlaque and Scroll despatched to Mrs. Luisa Francis Hepwoth, 9 Ardovollick Street, Hamilton, Ontario. Serial no. PA8.
November 17, 1920EligibleEligible for Victory and British War Medal.
November 17, 1920Memorial Cross DespatchedMemorial Cross despatched to Mrs. J. Wainwright, 45 New Scarborough Street, Tingley, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England. Serial no. 757427
December 4, 1920Scroll DespatchedScroll despatched to Mrs. Luisa Francis Hepwoth, 9 Ardovollick Street, Hamilton, Ontario. Serial no. 23130.

Acronyms

AWLAbsent Without Leave: Generally, a soldier would be deducted 1-days pay for every day absent. In some cases, the soldier would be confined to barracks. Sometimes it was a combination of both.
A ClassificationMedical Board Classification that determined your fitness for duty. A1, A2, A3 and A4 were assigned to different units with the expectation that these men would be able to serve with active combat units. See this link for more information.
B ClassificationMedical Board Classification that determined your fitness for duty. B1, B2, and B3 were assigned to different service units such as railway and forestry corps. See this link for more information.
D ClassificationSee this link for more information.
CAMCCanadian Army Medical Corp
CBConfined to Barracks: a punishment for minor infractions.
CCDCasualty Convalescent Depot: a depot at a base where men, in their final stages of convalescing, would be prepared for duty depending on their rating.
CCHCasualty Clearing Hospital
CCRCCanadian Corps Reserve Camp
CCSCasualty Clearing Station: this facility was attached to rail transportation from the front to hospitals on the coast of France
CDCCanadian Dispatch Camp
CFACanadian Field Ambulance/Canadian Field Artillery. Most common usage would be Canadian Field Ambulance.
DAHDisorderly Action of the Heart
DRSDivisional Rest Station
GSWGun Shot Wound – this was a generic term for all projectile penetrating wounds.
In the FieldThis term relates to a soldier arriving at an active-duty unit after transporting from England, to France, and then to his duty assignment. The routing varied from soldier to soldier and could take 2-3 days to several months.
MDMilitary District
PUOPyrexia of Unknown Origin: This was a term used for any illness that could not clearly be identified and typically was related to influenza symptoms.
SOSStruck Off Strength
TOSTaken On Strength
CAMCCanadian Army Medical Corp
CCHCasualty Clearing Hospital
CFACanadian Field Ambulance
DRSDivisional Rest Station
GSWGun Shot Wound – this was a generic term for all projectile penetrating wounds.
MDMilitary District
PUOPyrexia of Unknown Origin
SOSStruck Off Strength
TOSTaken On Strength
WORDWestern Ontario Regimental Depot

[i] The Summary of Service for this soldier is meant as just that, a summary of his service. It is not intended to be an exhaustive biographical relation of his life or his war service. Some information may be deliberately suppressed by the author out of sensitivity to the soldier. Readers are encouraged to reference the actual service records available at the Library and Archives Canada in PDF format if they wish to learn more about this soldier. Such additional information (i.e. hyperlinks etc.) are for informational purpose only and no claim to verification or accuracy is made by the author of this summary.

[ii] This street has been renamed.

Circumstances of Death Card "Died of Wounds" During the attack and capture of Courcelette on September 15, 1916, he was wounded by shrapnel in the left arm, left thigh, and spine. His wounds were attended to and he was later evacuated to No. 23 General Hospital, Etaples, where he succumbed to his wounds September 20th, 1916.
Circumstances of Death Card
“Died of Wounds”
During the attack and capture of Courcelette on September 15, 1916, he was wounded by shrapnel in the left arm, left thigh, and spine. His wounds were attended to and he was later evacuated to No. 23 General Hospital, Etaples, where he succumbed to his wounds September 20th, 1916.
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