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Thanks for Peter Moogk for reaching out to me we have another moment if the 18th Battalion's history captured and shared. This image shows the officers of "C" Company in September 1915 at West Sandling. To put that month in context, the Battalion left for England on the night of the 14th and had been... Continue Reading →

A “Soldier of Fortune” Returns…

Private Gordon Wellington Wilder, regimental no. 54265[i] of the 18th Battalion, CEF is an enigma. From his attestation papers on his enlistment he was a 30-year old Anglo-Irish British subject that indicated prior military experience with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and had served 2-years in the Sudan; 3-years in South Africa; and 13-months in China.... Continue Reading →

Poetry and Regret

Some time after the Armistice in 1918 and July 1921 a former private of the 18th Battalion wrote a poem and published it in pamphlet form. It is now an obscure document and would be lost to history save for the work of Canadiana Online. Hidden, waiting to be found was the pamphlet with its... Continue Reading →

“We Kingsville boys…”

A letter published in the November 4, 1915, edition of the Kingsville Reporter relates some of the experiences of Private "Harry" Sirverns, late of Kingsville, Ontario. The letter covers the early experiences of the 18th Battalion as it goes into the line and furnishes another lens from a foot soldier of the war from his... Continue Reading →

“WAS GOING TO TELL ABOUT THE TRENCHES”

Private Reginald Sachs was an 18th Battalion "Original" having enlisted in Galt, Ontario on October 23, 1914. This letter was printed October 29, 1915 and would describe the end of September or early October 1915 when the Battalion first entered the trenches in active duty after its training as part of the 2nd Canadian Contigent... Continue Reading →

“…a pretty near squeak…”

This is the last of a 4-part series of the analysis of articles relating to Private Frederick Hodson, who served with the 18th Battalion. Special thanks to Annette Fulford (@avidgenie) Lizbet Tobin, and Sharon Munro for assistance with this article. Private Frederick Hodson, M.M. of the 18th Battalion. Hodson is well established in England, as his... Continue Reading →

Not “Killed in Action”

In the early 1970s the last members of the 18th Battalion Association, purportedly the first post-Great War battalion association formed in Canada, was winding down. The number of members had declined due to age and many of these men, now in their 80s, wanted to put together a series of memories to share amongst themselves.... Continue Reading →

“Tangible recognition…”

This is the third of a 4-part series of the analysis of articles relating to Private Frederick Hodson, who served with the 18th Battalion. Special thanks to Annette Fulford (@avidgenie) and Lizbet Tobin for assistance with this article. From the previous stories we can get a sense of Hodson. He is a dutiful son and... Continue Reading →

Going Overseas…

A letter[i] written by Private David Aikin reg. no. 880497, of the 186th Overseas Battalion[ii], gives wonderful insight into the process involved for soldiers of the reinforcing battalions of the C.E.F. being transported from Canada to England. The letter shares the travels of a soldier from Canada to England at the start of 1917. The... Continue Reading →

The Last Meeting

On October 10, 1975, a full 61 years since the beginning of the Great War, a group of men ranging in age from 84 to 81 years old met in London, Ontario. These eight men, all of the veterans and members of the 18th Battalion were meeting the last time as members of the 18th... Continue Reading →

The War Keeps Up Its Everlasting Grind…

Above: Photos of St. Elois Craters. Captain Frederick Gilbert Newton, late of Windsor, Ontario, was an accountant that had been employed by the Canadian Bank of Commerce, now the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, may not have known that his employer would publish his letter in a pamphlet[i] for its employees and customers of the... Continue Reading →

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