Loghrin, Samuel Monteith: Major

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Digitized Service Records

Half brother to Corporal Donald Monteith Jeffery who was killed in action the same date.

Find-A-Grave

Sam Loghrin and half brother Cpl. Donald Monteith Jeffrey
“The brothers, Sam Loghrin and Don Jeffrey; photo contributed by Ed.Jeffrey. Sam arrived in Europe in August of 1914. This picture is likely to have been taken in Europe sometime after Don enlisted in July of 1915.” Source: http://www.loghrin.info/tree/appendices/ltr7.html

Summary of Service[i] for Major Samuel Monteith Loghrin.

DateEventRemarks
January 1, 1876BornBorn at the Township of Eramosa, Ontario, Canada. A news report indicates he was born at Guelph, Ontario.
October 1914Enlists CEFEnlists with the 18th Battalion, most likely at Stratford, Ontario. As an officer he would be responsible for the formation and recruiting of the men from that town.   He would have been 38 years old. A widow, he listed his trade or calling as Tanner Leather Goods Manufacture. He had served 12-years with the 28th Perth County Militia Regiment and 1 year with the 21st Essex Regiment.   His next-of-kin listed on his attestation papers was his son Samuel Fredric (Fritz) Loghrin, residing at 30 Marley Place, London, Ontario.   He stands 5’ 10.5” tall, weighs 154 lbs., and has a chest of 38” with a 3” expansion.
December 1914Separation AllowanceSeparation Allowance of $20.00 per month assigned to Miss Elizabeth Scholz, originally to 207 Patrick Street, Stratford, Ontario, then to 30 Marley Place, London, Ontario. She is caring for his two sons, Fritz and Radcliffe.
April 1915Assigns PayAssigns $25.00 per month to self care of the Royal Bank, Stratford, Ontario.
April 18, 1915Sails to EnglandEmbarks at Halifax, Nova Scotia aboard the SS Grampian.
September 15, 1915Disembarks for France and BelgiumThe 18th Battalion, along with units of the 2nd Canadian Division leave for service on the Continent.
February 18, 1916Granted LeaveGranted leave.
February 25, 1916Returns from Leave 
June 2, 1916AdmittedAdmitted North Midland Casualty Clearing Station for influenza.
June 4, 1916AdmittedAdmitted to No. 12 Casualty Clearing Station for PUO.
May 26, 1916Granted LeaveGranted leave to Scotland.
June 12, 1916Rejoined Unit 
September 15, 1916Killed in Action.“The first German trench was captured at 6:25 a.m. … The fire (artillery) again lifted and the Infantry in waves, advanced, following closely under the curtain of Shrapnel.
At 6:34 a.m. the second German trench was captured.  During the advance on the right, towards this trench, the 18th Battalion moving forward steadily, noticed a party of the enemy apparently ready to surrender.  Captain² S. M. Loghrin went forward to accept their surrender, and when doing so, was killed by a bomb³ thrown by one of the enemy party.  This foul act of treachery was observed by the men of his Company, with the result that none of the occupants of the trench were allowed to escape alive.”[ii]   His body is not identified and has no known grave. He is memorialized at the Vimy Monument.
October 10, 1916AppointedAppointed Pro Temp Major while commanding “A” Company per the London Gazette.
July 19, 1929War Service GratuityWar Service Gratuity in the sum of $192.00 granted to Mrs. S.J. Radcliffe, 36 Binscarth Road, Rosedale, Toronto, Ontario for his two children. His brother-in-law is S.J. Radcliffe, former principal of the London Normal School.
April 24, 1922Page of Honour DespatchedPage 12430 despatched to his son, Samuel Fredric (Fritz) Loghrin, residing at 36 Binscarth Road, Toronto, Ontario.
September 2, 1922DispatchedPlaque and Scroll no. P45691 dispatched to his son, Samuel Fredric (Fritz) Loghrin, residing at 36 Binscarth Road, Toronto, Ontario.
At or about September 2, 1922DispatchedMemorial Cross, serial no. 70397, dispatched to Mrs. France Matilda Jeffery, 105 Evelyn Crescent, Toronto, Ontario, as his wife predeceased him.

Acronyms

AWLAbsent Without Leave: Generally, a soldier would be deducted 1-days pay for every day absent. In some cases, the soldier would be confined to barracks. Sometimes it was a combination of both.
A ClassificationMedical Board Classification that determined your fitness for duty. A1, A2, A3 and A4 were assigned to different units with the expectation that these men would be able to serve with active combat units. See this link for more information.
B ClassificationMedical Board Classification that determined your fitness for duty. B1, B2, and B3 were assigned to different service units such as railway and forestry corps. See this link for more information.
D ClassificationSee this link for more information.
CAMCCanadian Army Medical Corp
CBConfined to Barracks: a punishment for minor infractions.
CCDCasualty Convalescent Depot: a depot at a base where men, in their final stages of convalescing, would be prepared for duty depending on their rating.
CCHCasualty Clearing Hospital
CCRCCanadian Corps Reserve Camp
CCSCasualty Clearing Station: this facility was attached to rail transportation from the front to hospitals on the coast of France
CFACanadian Field Ambulance
DAHDisorderly Action of the Heart
DRSDivisional Rest Station
GSWGun Shot Wound – this was a generic term for all projectile penetrating wounds.
In the FieldThis term relates to a soldier arriving at an active-duty unit after transporting from England, to France, and then to his duty assignment. The routing varied from soldier to soldier and could take 2-3 days to several months.
MDMilitary District
PUOPyrexia of Unknown Origin: This was a term used for any illness that could not clearly be identified and typically was related to influenza symptoms.
SOSStruck Off Strength
TOSTaken On Strength
CAMCCanadian Army Medical Corp
CCHCasualty Clearing Hospital
CFACanadian Field Ambulance
DRSDivisional Rest Station
GSWGun Shot Wound – this was a generic term for all projectile penetrating wounds.
MDMilitary District
PUOPyrexia of Unknown Origin
SOSStruck Off Strength
TOSTaken On Strength

[i] The Summary of Service for this soldier is meant as just that, a summary of his service. It is not intended to be an exhaustive biographical relation of his life or his war service. Some information may be deliberately suppressed by the author out of sensitivity to the soldier. Readers are encouraged to reference the actual service records available at the Library and Archives Canada in PDF format if they wish to learn more about this soldier. Such additional information (i.e. hyperlinks etc.) are for informational purpose only and no claim to verification or accuracy is made by the author of this summary.

[ii] Excerpts from The War Diary, “Operations of the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade at the Somme, Sept. 10th to 17th, 1916”.  The copy of the War Diary was contributed by Michael Jeffrey Loghrin.

The circumstances of Sam Loghrin’s death.

 

The first German trench was captured at 6:25 a.m. … The fire (artillery) again lifted and the Infantry in waves, advanced, following closely under the curtain of Shrapnel.¹
At 6:34 a.m. the second German trench was captured.  During the advance on the right, towards this trench, the 18th Battalion moving forward steadily, noticed a party of the enemy apparently ready to surrender.  Captain² S. M. Loghrin went forward to accept their surrender, and when doing so, was killed by a bomb³ thrown by one of the enemy party.  This foul act of treachery was observed by the men of his Company, with the result that none of the occupants of the trench were allowed to escape alive.¹
No details have been discovered about Don Jeffrey’s death; however, he died on the same day in the same battle.

¹ Excerpts from The War Diary, “Operations of the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade at the Somme, Sept. 10th to 17th, 1916”.  The copy of the War Diary was contributed by Michael Jeffrey Loghrin.
² Sam had been an acting Major and was promoted to Major posthumously.
³ In current parlance this would be known as a grenade.

Per:   http://www.loghrin.info/tree/appendices/story8.html

88369592_3104151392941896_8622805269501444096_n
Source: Operation Picture Me via The 18th Battalion Facebook Group. London Advertiser Circa 1916.
Samuel Monteith Loghrin

Source: Operation Picture Me via The 18th Battalion Facebook Group. London Free Press. September 21, 1916.

31829_B016750-00534
According to “Duty Nobly Done” (page 211) Loghrin was killed when a German soldier, who had surrendered, took out a concealed grenade and through it, killing Loghrin. Circumstances of Death Register lists him as “Killed in Action.”
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