“…because life in the trenches was less irksome and monotonous and no more beastly than in places like Bouvigny Huts”

Bouvigny Huts. Bouvigny Huts. Those two words may have spelled mixed feelings with the Battalion. This would be the first time they ware billeted there but other battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force reported the conditions for this facility in the rear that “…life in the trenches was less irksome and monotonous and no more … Continue reading “…because life in the trenches was less irksome and monotonous and no more beastly than in places like Bouvigny Huts”

First Galt Daily Reporter Employee to Be Wounded

An article in the December 21, 1915 edition of the Galt Daily Reported relates the first casualty from former Galt Reporter employees serving in the war, Private John Hollins, had been wounded during service with the 18th Battalion. Private Hollins enlisted on November 4, 1914, at Galt with the 18th Battalion and gave his trade … Continue reading First Galt Daily Reporter Employee to Be Wounded

“After a long period free from local casualties…”: The Wounding of Private Hollins

An article in the December 21, 1915 edition of the Galt Daily Reported relates the first casualty from Galt in the war, Private John Hollins, had been wounded during service with the 18th Battalion.[i] PTE. J. HOLLINS HAS BEEN WOUNDED FORMER EMPLOYEE OF THE REPORTED ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL AT BOULOGNE After a long period free … Continue reading “After a long period free from local casualties…”: The Wounding of Private Hollins

One of the Best Looking Men: Lieut. Clarke at St. Eloi

18th Battalion Association[i] Windsor and Detroit Branch *MEMORIES* At one of our Reunion Dinners some years ago, one of he speakers mentioned Lieut. John Clarke[ii], but placed him in the wrong Company. Lieut. Clarke was the Officer in charge of Thirteen Platoon. The other “D” Company Officers were Lieut’s Ambery, McIntosh, and Dillon. Lieut. Clarke, … Continue reading One of the Best Looking Men: Lieut. Clarke at St. Eloi

The Greatest Devotion to Duty: Casualties at Passchendaele

The 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade (4th C.I.B.) was engaged at Passchendaele in November 1917. Compared with some other Canadian Brigades and Battalions it was not as heavily engaged but the costs to the Brigade was high. The 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade suffered a total of 1,268 casualties (killed in action and wounded) with 73 men … Continue reading The Greatest Devotion to Duty: Casualties at Passchendaele