He is Still Living

WARNING: Some details in this post may be disturbing to readers.   In a news clipping titled Letters from the Soldiers in the Paisely Advocate dated October 16, 1918, Private Edgar Joseph McAfee writes in it, “Let me know in your next letter if Jack Dobson is still living. I helped carry him out of... Continue Reading →

“…because life in the trenches was less irksome and monotonous and no more beastly than in places like Bouvigny Huts”

Bouvigny Huts. Bouvigny Huts. Those two words may have spelled mixed feelings with the Battalion. This would be the first time they ware billeted there but other battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force reported the conditions for this facility in the rear that “…life in the trenches was less irksome and monotonous and no more... Continue Reading →

Two Men. Two Scouts. One Raid.

On the night of July 26/27 men of the 18th Battalion carried out a “minor trench raid”. The weather was “Fine but dull”[i] on that day. In that raid were two men, originals with the Battalion, who both have quite different stories. Private Forrester Private Alfred Forrester, reg. no. 53648[ii] war service started out rather... Continue Reading →

Not “Killed in Action”

In the early 1970s the last members of the 18th Battalion Association, purportedly the first post-Great War battalion association formed in Canada, was winding down. The number of members had declined due to age and many of these men, now in their 80s, wanted to put together a series of memories to share amongst themselves.... Continue Reading →

Review of Presentation: Before Shell Shock: Failed Minds & Failing Men in the 19th Century British Military

Speaker: Professor Amy Smith-Milne Venue: Guelph Civic Museum This talk by Amy Smith-Milne was an excellent pre-cursor to helping someone understand the perspectives towards the men who suffered from shell shock during World War 1. The work of doctors during the Victorian era would influence the treatment of mental illness during this war. Using the... Continue Reading →

Fritz mush have got his eyes on us…

The letter below is a wonderful example of the process Canadian Expeditionary Force soldiers experienced during the Great War when they were transferred from their training bases in England to active duty with a combat unit on the Continent. Private Frank Allan Westlake had enlisted with the 161st Huron Battalion on January 10, 1916 and... Continue Reading →

The Attentions of Miss Mary

18th Battalion Association[i] Windsor and Detroit Branch *MEMORIES[ii]* Do you remember that just before Christmas (1915) every member of the Battalion received a nice gift package from the people of Windsor. Inside each package was a card showing the name of the donor. You were supposed to sign the card and hand it back in.... Continue Reading →

War Diary of the 18th Battalion: July 1918

Confidential War Diary of 18th CANADIAN BATTALION – 2nd CANADIAN DIVISION From 1st July to 31st July, 1918 Volume 35 With appendices 1 - 7 Place Date Hour Summary of Events and Information G.H.Q. RESERVE LATERE-ST-QUENTIN. J.23, 24, 29 and 30. Bn. Hdqrs at J.25.d.80.20 1 Lorries called at 7.45 a.m. and took about 14... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑